The Origin of almost all Jewish Ashkenazi Surnames .

Standard
jewish surname mapSlateRichard Andree’s 1881 map of the Jews of Central Europe.

Ashkenazic Jews were among the last Europeans to take family names. Some German-speaking Jews took last names as early as the 17th century, but the overwhelming majority of Jews lived in Eastern Europe and did not take last names until compelled to do so. The process began in the Austro-Hungarian Empire in 1787 and ended in Czarist Russia in 1844.

In attempting to build modern nation-states, the authorities insisted that Jews take last names so that they could be taxed, drafted, and educated (in that order of importance). For centuries, Jewish communal leaders were responsible for collecting taxes from the Jewish population on behalf of the government, and in some cases were responsible for filling draft quotas. Education was traditionally an internal Jewish affair.

Until this period, Jewish names generally changed with every generation. For example, if Moses son of Mendel (Moyshe ben Mendel) married Sarah daughter of Rebecca (Sara bat rivka), and they had a boy and named it Samuel (Shmuel), the child would be called Shmuel ben Moyshe. If they had a girl and named her Feygele, she would be called Feygele bas Sora.

Jews distrusted the authorities and resisted the new requirement. Although they were forced to take last names, at first they were used only for official purposes. Among themselves, they kept their traditional names. Over time, Jews accepted the new last names, which were essential as Jews sought to advance within the broader society and as the shtetles were transformed or Jews left them for big cities.

The easiest way for Jews to assume an official last name was to adapt the name they already had, making it permanent. This explains the use of “patronymics” and “matronymics.”

PATRONYMICS (son of …)

In Yiddish or German, “son” would be denoted by “son” or “sohn” or “er.” In most Slavic languages, like Polish or Russian, it would be “wich” or “witz.”

For example: The son of Mendel took the last name Mendelsohn; the son of Abraham became Abramson or Avromovitch; the son of Menashe became Manishewitz; the son of Itzhak became Itskowitz; the son of Berl took the name Berliner; the son of Kesl took the name Kessler, etc.

MATRONYMICS (daughter of …)

Reflecting the prominence of Jewish women in business, some families made last names out of women’s first names: Chaiken — son of Chaikeh; Edelman — husband of Edel; Gittelman — husband of Gitl; Glick or Gluck — may derive from Glickl, a popular woman’s name as in the famous “Glickl of Hameln,” whose memoirs, written around 1690, are an early example of Yiddish literature.

Gold/Goldman/Gulden may derived from Golda; Malkov from Malke; Perlman — husband of Perl; Rivken — may derive from Rivke; Soronsohn—son of Sarah.

PLACE NAMES

The next most common source of Jewish last names is probably places. Jews used the town or region where they lived, or where their families came from, as their last name. As a result, the Germanic origins of most East European Jews is reflected in their names.

For example, Asch is an acronym for the towns of Aisenshtadt or Altshul orAmshterdam. Other place-based Jewish names include: Auerbach/Orbach; Bacharach; Berger (generic for townsman); Berg(man), meaning from a hilly place; Bayer — from Bavaria; Bamberger; Berliner, Berlinsky — from Berlin; Bloch (foreigner); Brandeis; Breslau; Brodsky; Brody; Danziger; Deutch/Deutscher — German;Drues ( Drus)… the estate of the Count ( Jewish) of Drues near Villi nus ( Vilna)  ,Dorf(man), meaning villager; Eisenberg; Epstein; Florsheim; Frankel — from the Franconia region of Germany; Frankfurter; Ginsberg; Gordon — from Grodno, Lithuania or from the Russian word gorodin, for townsman; Greenberg; Halperin—from Helbronn, Germany; Hammerstein; Heller — from Halle, Germany; Hollander — not from Holland, but from a town in Lithuania settled by the Dutch; Horowitz, Hurwich, Gurevitch — from Horovice in Bohemia; Koenigsberg; Krakauer — from Cracow, Poland; Landau; Lipsky — from Leipzig, Germany; Litwak — from Lithuania; Minsky — from Minsk, Belarus; Mintz—from Mainz, Germany; Oppenheimer; Ostreicher — from Austria; Pinsky — from Pinsk, Belarus; Posner — from Posen, Germany; Prager — from Prague; Rappoport — from Porto, Italy; Rothenberg — from the town of the red fortress in Germany; Shapiro — from Speyer, Germany; Schlesinger — from Silesia, Germany; Steinberg; Unger — from Hungary; Vilner — from Vilna, Poland/Lithuania; Wallach—from Bloch, derived from the Polish word for foreigner; Warshauer/Warshavsky — from Warsaw; Wiener — from Vienna; Weinberg.

OCCUPATIONAL NAMES

Craftsmen/Workers

Ackerman — plowman; Baker/Boker — baker; Blecher — tinsmith; Fleisher/Fleishman/Katzoff/Metger — butcher; Cooperman — coppersmith; Drucker — printer; Einstein — mason; Farber — painter/dyer; Feinstein — jeweler; Fisher — fisherman; Forman — driver/teamster; Garber/Gerber — tanner; Glazer/Glass/Sklar — glazier; Goldstein — goldsmith; Graber — engraver; Kastner — cabinetmaker; Kunstler — artist; Kramer — storekeeper; Miller — miller; Nagler — nailmaker; Plotnick — carpenter; Sandler/Shuster — shoemaker; Schmidt/Kovalsky — blacksmith; Shnitzer — carver; Silverstein — jeweler; Spielman — player (musician?); Stein/Steiner/Stone — jeweler; Wasserman — water carrier.

Merchants

Garfinkel/Garfunkel — diamond dealer; Holzman/Holtz/Waldman — timber dealer; Kaufman — merchant; Rokeach — spice merchant; Salzman — salt merchant; Seid/Seidman—silk merchant; Tabachnik — snuff seller; Tuchman — cloth merchant; Wachsman — wax dealer; Wechsler/Halphan — money changer; Wollman — wool merchant; Zucker/Zuckerman — sugar merchant.

Related to tailoring

Kravitz/Portnoy/Schneider/Snyder — tailor; Nadelman/Nudelman — also tailor, but from “needle”; Sher/Sherman — also tailor, but from “scissors” or “shears”; Presser/Pressman — clothing presser; Futterman/Kirshner/Kushner/Peltz — furrier; Weber — weaver.

Medical

Aptheker — druggist; Feldsher — surgeon; Bader/Teller — barber.

Related to liquor trade

Bronfman/Brand/Brandler/Brenner — distiller; Braverman/Meltzer — brewer; Kabakoff/Krieger/Vigoda — tavern keeper; Geffen — wine merchant; Wine/Weinglass — wine merchant; Weiner — wine maker.

Religious/Communal

Altshul/Althshuler — associated with the old synagogue in Prague; Cantor/Kazan/Singer/Spivack — cantor or song leader in shul; Feder/Federman/Schreiber — scribe; Haver — from haver (court official); Klausner — rabbi for small congregation; Klopman — calls people to morning prayers by knocking on their window shutters; Lehrer/Malamud/Malmud — teacher; Rabin — rabbi (Rabinowitz—son of rabbi); London — scholar, from the Hebrew lamden(misunderstood by immigration inspectors); Reznick — ritual slaughterer; Richter — judge; Sandek — godfather; Schechter/Schachter/Shuchter etc. — ritual slaughterer from Hebrew schochet; Shofer/Sofer/Schaeffer — scribe; Shulman/Skolnick — sexton; Spector — inspector or supervisor of schools.

PERSONAL TRAITS

Alter/Alterman — old; Dreyfus—three legged, perhaps referring to someone who walked with a cane; Erlich — honest; Frum — devout ; Gottleib — God lover, perhaps referring to someone very devout; Geller/Gelber — yellow, perhaps referring to someone with blond hair; Gross/Grossman — big; Gruber — coarse or vulgar; Feifer/Pfeifer — whistler; Fried/Friedman—happy; Hoch/Hochman/Langer/Langerman — tall; Klein/Kleinman — small; Koenig — king, perhaps someone who was chosen as a “Purim King,” in reality a poor wretch; Krauss — curly, as in curly hair; Kurtz/Kurtzman — short; Reich/Reichman — rich; Reisser — giant; Roth/Rothman — red head; Roth/Rothbard — red beard; Shein/Schoen/Schoenman — pretty, handsome; Schwartz/Shwartzman/Charney — black hair or dark complexion; Scharf/Scharfman — sharp, i.e  intelligent; Stark — strong, from the Yiddish shtark ; Springer — lively person, from the Yiddish springen for jump.

INSULTING NAMES

These were sometimes foisted on Jews who discarded them as soon as possible, but a few may remain:

Billig — cheap; Gans — goose; Indyk — goose; Grob — rough/crude; Kalb — cow.

ANIMAL NAMES

It is common among all peoples to take last names from the animal kingdom. Baer/Berman/Beerman/Berkowitz/Beronson — bear; Adler — eagle (may derive from reference to an eagle in Psalm 103:5); Einhorn — unicorn; Falk/Sokol/Sokolovksy — falcon; Fink — finch; Fuchs/Liss — fox; Gelfand/Helfand — camel (technically means elephant but was used for camel too); Hecht—pike; Hirschhorn — deer antlers; Karp — carp; Loeb — lion; Ochs— ox; Strauss — ostrich (or bouquet of flowers); Wachtel — quail.

HEBREW NAMES

Some Jews either held on to or adopted traditional Jewish names from the Bible and Talmud. The big two are Cohen (Cohn, Kohn, Kahan, Kahn, Kaplan) and Levi (Levy, Levine, Levinsky, Levitan, Levenson, Levitt, Lewin, Lewinsky, Lewinson). Others include: Aaron — Aronson, Aronoff; Asher; Benjamin; David — Davis, Davies; Ephraim — Fishl; Emanuel — Mendel; Isaac — Isaacs, Isaacson/Eisner; Jacob — Jacobs, Jacobson, Jacoby; Judah — Idelsohn, Udell,Yudelson; Mayer/Meyer; Menachem — Mann, Mendel; Reuben — Rubin; Samuel — Samuels, Zangwill; Simon — Schimmel; Solomon — Zalman.

HEBREW ACRONYMS

Names based on Hebrew acronyms include: Baron — bar aron (son of Aaron); Beck —bene kedoshim (descendant of martyrs); Getz — gabbai tsedek (righteous synagogue official); Katz — kohen tsedek (righteous priest); Metz — moreh tsedek (teacher of righteousness); Sachs, Saks — zera kodesh shemo (his name descends from martyrs); Segal — se gan levia (second-rank Levite).

OTHER HEBREW- and YIDDISH-DERIVED NAMES

Lieb means “lion” in Yiddish. It is the root of many Ashkenazic last names, including Liebowitz, Lefkowitz, Lebush, and Leon. It is the Yiddish translation of the Hebrew word for lion — aryeh. The lion was the symbol of the tribe of Judah.

Hirsch means “deer” or “stag” in Yiddish. It is the root of many Ashkenazic last names, including Hirschfeld, Hirschbein/Hershkowitz (son of Hirsch), Hertz/Herzl, Cerf, Hart, and Hartman. It is the Yiddish translation of the Hebrew word for gazelle: tsvi. The gazelle was the symbol of the tribe of Naphtali.

Taub means “dove” in Yiddish. It is the root of the Ashkenazic last name Tauber. The symbol of the dove is associated with the prophet Jonah.

Wolf is the root of the Ashkenazic last names Wolfson, Wouk, and Volkovich. The wolf was the symbol of the tribe of Benjamin.

Eckstein — Yiddish for cornerstone, derived from Psalm 118:22.

Good(man) — Yiddish translation of the Hebrew word for “good”: tuviah.

Margolin — Hebrew for “pearl.”

INVENTED ‘FANCY SHMANCY’ NAMES

When Jews in the Austro-Hungarian Empire were required to assume last names, some chose the nicest ones they could think of and may have been charged a registration fee by the authorities. According to the YIVO Encyclopedia, “The resulting names often are associated with nature and beauty. It is very plausible that the choices were influenced by the general romantic tendencies of German culture at that time.” These names include: Applebaum — apple tree; Birnbaum — pear tree; Buchsbaum — box tree; Kestenbaum — chestnut tree; Kirshenbaum — cherry tree; Mandelbaum — almond tree; Nussbaum — nut tree; Tannenbaum — fir tree; Teitelbaum — palm tree.

Other names, chosen or purchased, were combinations with these roots:Blumen (flower), Fein (fine), Gold, Green, Lowen (lion), Rosen (rose), Schoen/Schein (pretty) — combined with berg (hill or mountain), thal (valley), bloom (flower), zweig (wreath), blatt (leaf), vald or wald (woods), feld (field).

Miscellaneous other names included Diamond; Glick/Gluck — luck; Hoffman — hopeful; Fried/Friedman — happiness; Lieber/Lieberman — lover.

Jewish family names from non-Jewish languages included: Sender/Saunders — from Alexander; Kagan — descended from the Khazars, a Turkic-speaking people from Central Asia; Kelman/Kalman — from the Greek name Kalonymous, the Greek translation of the Hebrew shem tov (good name), popular among Jews in medieval France and Italy; Marcus/Marx — from Latin, referring to the pagan god Mars.

Finally, there were Jewish names changed or shortened by immigration inspectors or by immigrants themselves (or their descendants) to sound more American, which is why “Sean Ferguson” was a Jew.

Let us close with a ditty:

And this is good old Boston;
The home of the bean and the cod.
Where the Lowells speak only to the Cabots;
And the Cabots speak Yiddish, by God!

A version of this post originally appeared on Jewish Currents.

Bennett Muraskin is a contributing writer to Jewish Currents magazine and author of The Association of Jewish Libraries Guide to Yiddish Short Stories and Let Justice Well Up Like Water: Progressive Jews from Hillel to Helen Suzman, among other books.

NOW WATCH: This Midwestern Saying About Cheese Makes No Sense To The Rest Of America

Whow. What Incredible Results Cape Town’s United Hebrew Day School Network. www.Herzlia.com Matric Results ( by Stephen Darori a Alumni of the 80’s)

Standard

Jewish Academic Excellence is a 2000 Year Old Tradition

Dear Friends of Herzlia

After what seems like an interminable wait, we are delighted to announce the results of HERZLIA’s Matric Class of 2013 and to confirm that our pupils have once again excelled.

Please note that the National Senior Certificate (NSC) results are reported as follows:

  • There are no aggregates
  • The term ‘Matric Exemption” has been replaced by ‘Admission to Higher Education – PASS BACHELORS’
  • ‘Admission to Higher Education – PASS DIPLOMA’ indicates admissions to various diploma courses.

Following is a summary of the HERZLIA Matric results for 2013:

115 Matric candidates

100% pass rate – academically inclusive school

112 admissions to Higher Education – PASS BACHELORS (Matric Exemption) = (97.4%)

337 Subject Distinctions

2 candidates, Hannah Delit and Kezia Varkel, achieved 100% for Economics.

92 out of 115 candidates achieved one or more distinctions (80%)

1 candidate achieved 10 out of 10 distinctions

2 candidates achieved 9 out of 9 distinctions

2 candidates achieved 8 out of 8 distinctions

3 candidates achieved 7 out of 8 distinctions

2 candidates achieved 7 out of 7 distinctions

8 candidates achieved 6 distinctions

10 candidates achieved 5 distinctions

19 candidates achieved 4 distinctions

14 candidates achieved 3 distinctions

14 candidates achieved 2 distinctions

16 candidates achieved 1 distinction

DETAILS OF SUBJECT DISTINCTIONS

SUBJECT

DISTINCTIONS

NO. OF CANDIDATES

ACCOUNTING

9

13

ADVANCED PROGRAMME MATHEMATICS (APM)

3

5

AFRIKAANS

27

109

BUSINESS STUDIES

21

37

CAT

3

5

CONSUMER STUDIES

2

21

DANCE

1

1

DESIGN

4

8

DRAMATIC ARTS

23

30

ECONOMICS

17

27

ENGLISH

26

115

GEOGRAPHY

2

2

GREEK

1

1

HEBREW

4

7

HISTORY

34

56

IT

18

28

LIFE ORIENTATION

67

115

LIFE SCIENCES

18

58

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY

9

18

MATHEMATICS

17

96

MATHEMATICS PAPER 3

5

30

MUSIC

1

1

PHYSICAL SCIENCE

17

41

TOURISM

1

4

VISUAL ARTS

10

16

INDIVIDUAL ACHIEVEMENTS

10 out of 10 Distinctions

Saul Bloch

9 out of 9 Distinctions

Tamsin Kantor

Joshua Stein

8 out of 8 Distinctions

Cleo Candy

Jamie Froman

7 out of 8 Distinctions

Gary Finkelstein

Tao Klitzner

Kezia Varkel

7 out of 7 Distinctions

Richard Harrisberg

Georgia Saacks

6 Distinctions

Rael Alexander

Micaela Jacobson

Daniel Marcus

Ben Rubin

Nicole Saacks

Rachel Serraf

Levi Todes
Sarah Zinn

5 Distinctions
Lauri Epstein

Zachary Fleishman

Adam Kaliski

Aviva Lerer

Joshua Luck

Shane Robinson

Adam Rosendorff

Gabriella Tadmor

Kayo-Fay Tilley

Asher Woolff

4 Distinctions

Adam Alhadeff

Talia Anstey

Aidyn Breiter

Jesse Brooks

Nicholas Carson

Ricky Conn

Hannah Delit

Mira Friedman

Alison Goldstein

Jamie Goldstein

Ryan Jones

Lauren Kawalsky

Raphaella Lewis
Gadiel Margolin

Martine Sandler

Kayla Shaban

Tevya Shapiro

Lisa Stein

Aaron Weinstein

3 Distinctions

Jesse Copelyn

Jason Cumings

Adam Edelberg

Joshua Grant

Brandon Hall

Lauren Joffe

Ryan Kopping

Lebone Matshitse

Gina Reingold

Ariel Rubin

Miron Sarembock

Aiden Suskin

Carly Sutherland

Jasmine Waynik

2 Distinctions

Emily Bagg

Abigail Berkovitz

Mark Borland

Rachael Coxen

Steven Fine

Daniel Horwitz

Sasha Johns

Talia Kadish

Sean Kopman

Mika Marcuson

Simone Metz

Joshua Michelson

Matthew Miller

Daniel Sack

1 Distinction

Joseph Ackerman

Jenna Arnsmeyer

Joshua Berkman

Lauri Burke

Jarrod Burts

Hadar Gerassi

Zachary Helfrich

Jason Holzberg

Lindi Levin

Savannah Marescia

Brad Reingold

Gabbi Sank

Gabi Slotow

Sivana Stevenson

Chanan Suiza

Alexa Venter

Faye Zachariadi

I am delighted with these results: they are outstanding!

It is clear that right across the spectrum of these results, the class of 2013 and their teachers have worked extremely hard, tirelessly in fact, to achieve so brilliantly.  This would not be possible without the excellent educational foundation that was laid from Pre-Primary level upwards.

Congratulations and thanks to all of the teachers involved.

Mazeltov to the Matrics of 2013 and their parents.  They have definitely done HERZLIA and their community proud.

MARIANNE MARKSPRINCIPAL, HERZLIA HIGH SCHOOL

MH Goldschmidt Avenue, Highlands Estate, Cape Town, 8001
PO Box 3508, Cape Town, 8000
Tel: +27 21 464 3300  Fax: +27 21 461 8834
Email: mmarks@herzlia.comWeb: http://www.herzlia.com

GEOFF COHENDirector of EducationMH Goldschmidt Avenue, Highlands Estate, Cape Town, 8001
PO Box 3508, Cape Town, 8000
Tel: +27 21 464 3304  Fax: +27 21 461 8647Email: mailto:geoffc@herzlia.com Web: http://www.herzlia.com

 

Dear Friends of Herzlia

After what seems like an interminable wait, we are delighted to announce the results of HERZLIA’s Matric Class of 2013 and to confirm that our pupils have once again excelled.

Please note that the National Senior Certificate (NSC) results are reported as follows:

  • There are no aggregates
  • The term ‘Matric Exemption” has been replaced by ‘Admission to Higher Education – PASS BACHELORS’
  • ‘Admission to Higher Education – PASS DIPLOMA’ indicates admissions to various diploma courses.

Following is a summary of the HERZLIA Matric results for 2013:

115 Matric candidates

100% pass rate – academically inclusive school

112 admissions to Higher Education – PASS BACHELORS (Matric Exemption) = (97.4%)

337 Subject Distinctions

2 candidates, Hannah Delit and Kezia Varkel, achieved 100% for Economics.

92 out of 115 candidates achieved one or more distinctions (80%)

1 candidate achieved 10 out of 10 distinctions

2 candidates achieved 9 out of 9 distinctions

2 candidates achieved 8 out of 8 distinctions

3 candidates achieved 7 out of 8 distinctions

2 candidates achieved 7 out of 7 distinctions

8 candidates achieved 6 distinctions

10 candidates achieved 5 distinctions

19 candidates achieved 4 distinctions

14 candidates achieved 3 distinctions

14 candidates achieved 2 distinctions

16 candidates achieved 1 distinction

DETAILS OF SUBJECT DISTINCTIONS

SUBJECT

DISTINCTIONS

NO. OF CANDIDATES

ACCOUNTING

9

13

ADVANCED PROGRAMME MATHEMATICS (APM)

3

5

AFRIKAANS

27

109

BUSINESS STUDIES

21

37

CAT

3

5

CONSUMER STUDIES

2

21

DANCE

1

1

DESIGN

4

8

DRAMATIC ARTS

23

30

ECONOMICS

17

27

ENGLISH

26

115

GEOGRAPHY

2

2

GREEK

1

1

HEBREW

4

7

HISTORY

34

56

IT

18

28

LIFE ORIENTATION

67

115

LIFE SCIENCES

18

58

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY

9

18

MATHEMATICS

17

96

MATHEMATICS PAPER 3

5

30

MUSIC

1

1

PHYSICAL SCIENCE

17

41

TOURISM

1

4

VISUAL ARTS

10

16

INDIVIDUAL ACHIEVEMENTS

10 out of 10 Distinctions

Saul Bloch

9 out of 9 Distinctions

Tamsin Kantor

Joshua Stein

8 out of 8 Distinctions

Cleo Candy

Jamie Froman

7 out of 8 Distinctions

Gary Finkelstein

Tao Klitzner

Kezia Varkel

7 out of 7 Distinctions

Richard Harrisberg

Georgia Saacks

6 Distinctions

Rael Alexander

Micaela Jacobson

Daniel Marcus

Ben Rubin

Nicole Saacks

Rachel Serraf

Levi Todes
Sarah Zinn

5 Distinctions
Lauri Epstein

Zachary Fleishman

Adam Kaliski

Aviva Lerer

Joshua Luck

Shane Robinson

Adam Rosendorff

Gabriella Tadmor

Kayo-Fay Tilley

Asher Woolff

4 Distinctions

Adam Alhadeff

Talia Anstey

Aidyn Breiter

Jesse Brooks

Nicholas Carson

Ricky Conn

Hannah Delit

Mira Friedman

Alison Goldstein

Jamie Goldstein

Ryan Jones

Lauren Kawalsky

Raphaella Lewis
Gadiel Margolin

Martine Sandler

Kayla Shaban

Tevya Shapiro

Lisa Stein

Aaron Weinstein

3 Distinctions

Jesse Copelyn

Jason Cumings

Adam Edelberg

Joshua Grant

Brandon Hall

Lauren Joffe

Ryan Kopping

Lebone Matshitse

Gina Reingold

Ariel Rubin

Miron Sarembock

Aiden Suskin

Carly Sutherland

Jasmine Waynik

2 Distinctions

Emily Bagg

Abigail Berkovitz

Mark Borland

Rachael Coxen

Steven Fine

Daniel Horwitz

Sasha Johns

Talia Kadish

Sean Kopman

Mika Marcuson

Simone Metz

Joshua Michelson

Matthew Miller

Daniel Sack

1 Distinction

Joseph Ackerman

Jenna Arnsmeyer

Joshua Berkman

Lauri Burke

Jarrod Burts

Hadar Gerassi

Zachary Helfrich

Jason Holzberg

Dear Friends of Herzlia

After what seems like an interminable wait, we are delighted to announce the results of HERZLIA’s Matric Class of 2013 and to confirm that our pupils have once again excelled.

Please note that the National Senior Certificate (NSC) results are reported as follows:

  • There are no aggregates
  • The term ‘Matric Exemption” has been replaced by ‘Admission to Higher Education – PASS BACHELORS’
  • ‘Admission to Higher Education – PASS DIPLOMA’ indicates admissions to various diploma courses.

Following is a summary of the HERZLIA Matric results for 2013:

115 Matric candidates

100% pass rate – academically inclusive school

112 admissions to Higher Education – PASS BACHELORS (Matric Exemption) = (97.4%)

337 Subject Distinctions

2 candidates, Hannah Delit and Kezia Varkel, achieved 100% for Economics.

92 out of 115 candidates achieved one or more distinctions (80%)

1 candidate achieved 10 out of 10 distinctions

2 candidates achieved 9 out of 9 distinctions

2 candidates achieved 8 out of 8 distinctions

3 candidates achieved 7 out of 8 distinctions

2 candidates achieved 7 out of 7 distinctions

8 candidates achieved 6 distinctions

10 candidates achieved 5 distinctions

19 candidates achieved 4 distinctions

14 candidates achieved 3 distinctions

14 candidates achieved 2 distinctions

16 candidates achieved 1 distinction

DETAILS OF SUBJECT DISTINCTIONS

SUBJECT

DISTINCTIONS

NO. OF CANDIDATES

ACCOUNTING

9

13

ADVANCED PROGRAMME MATHEMATICS (APM)

3

5

AFRIKAANS

27

109

BUSINESS STUDIES

21

37

CAT

3

5

CONSUMER STUDIES

2

21

DANCE

1

1

DESIGN

4

8

DRAMATIC ARTS

23

30

ECONOMICS

17

27

ENGLISH

26

115

GEOGRAPHY

2

2

GREEK

1

1

HEBREW

4

7

HISTORY

34

56

IT

18

28

LIFE ORIENTATION

67

115

LIFE SCIENCES

18

58

MATHEMATICAL LITERACY

9

18

MATHEMATICS

17

96

MATHEMATICS PAPER 3

5

30

MUSIC

1

1

PHYSICAL SCIENCE

17

41

TOURISM

1

4

VISUAL ARTS

10

16

INDIVIDUAL ACHIEVEMENTS

10 out of 10 Distinctions

Saul Bloch

9 out of 9 Distinctions

Tamsin Kantor

Joshua Stein

8 out of 8 Distinctions

Cleo Candy

Jamie Froman

7 out of 8 Distinctions

Gary Finkelstein

Tao Klitzner

Kezia Varkel

7 out of 7 Distinctions

Richard Harrisberg

Georgia Saacks

6 Distinctions

Rael Alexander

Micaela Jacobson

Daniel Marcus

Ben Rubin

Nicole Saacks

Rachel Serraf

Levi Todes
Sarah Zinn

5 Distinctions
Lauri Epstein

Zachary Fleishman

Adam Kaliski

Aviva Lerer

Joshua Luck

Shane Robinson

Adam Rosendorff

Gabriella Tadmor

Kayo-Fay Tilley

Asher Woolff

4 Distinctions

Adam Alhadeff

Talia Anstey

Aidyn Breiter

Jesse Brooks

Nicholas Carson

Ricky Conn

Hannah Delit

Mira Friedman

Alison Goldstein

Jamie Goldstein

Ryan Jones

Lauren Kawalsky

Raphaella Lewis
Gadiel Margolin

Martine Sandler

Kayla Shaban

Tevya Shapiro

Lisa Stein

Aaron Weinstein

3 Distinctions

Jesse Copelyn

Jason Cumings

Adam Edelberg

Joshua Grant

Brandon Hall

Lauren Joffe

Ryan Kopping

Lebone Matshitse

Gina Reingold

Ariel Rubin

Miron Sarembock

Aiden Suskin

Carly Sutherland

Jasmine Waynik

2 Distinctions

Emily Bagg

Abigail Berkovitz

Mark Borland

Rachael Coxen

Steven Fine

Daniel Horwitz

Sasha Johns

Talia Kadish

Sean Kopman

Mika Marcuson

Simone Metz

Joshua Michelson

Matthew Miller

Daniel Sack

1 Distinction

Joseph Ackerman

Jenna Arnsmeyer

Joshua Berkman

Lauri Burke

Jarrod Burts

Hadar Gerassi

Zachary Helfrich

Jason Holzberg

Lindi Levin

Savannah Marescia

Brad Reingold

Gabbi Sank

Gabi Slotow

Sivana Stevenson

Chanan Suiza

Alexa Venter

Faye Zachariadi

I am delighted with these results: they are outstanding!

It is clear that right across the spectrum of these results, the class of 2013 and their teachers have worked extremely hard, tirelessly in fact, to achieve so brilliantly.  This would not be possible without the excellent educational foundation that was laid from Pre-Primary level upwards.

Congratulations and thanks to all of the teachers involved.

Mazeltov to the Matrics of 2013 and their parents.  They have definitely done HERZLIA and their community proud.

MARIANNE MARKSPRINCIPAL, HERZLIA HIGH SCHOOL

MH Goldschmidt Avenue, Highlands Estate, Cape Town, 8001
PO Box 3508, Cape Town, 8000
Tel: +27 21 464 3300  Fax: +27 21 461 8834
Email: mmarks@herzlia.comWeb: http://www.herzlia.com

GEOFF COHENDirector of EducationMH Goldschmidt Avenue, Highlands Estate, Cape Town, 8001
PO Box 3508, Cape Town, 8000
Tel: +27 21 464 3304  Fax: +27 21 461 8647Email: mailto:geoffc@herzlia.com Web: http://www.herzlia.com

Lindi Levin

Savannah Marescia

Brad Reingold

Gabbi Sank

Gabi Slotow

Sivana Stevenson

Chanan Suiza

Alexa Venter

Faye Zachariadi

I am delighted with these results: they are outstanding!

It is clear that right across the spectrum of these results, the class of 2013 and their teachers have worked extremely hard, tirelessly in fact, to achieve so brilliantly.  This would not be possible without the excellent educational foundation that was laid from Pre-Primary level upwards.

Congratulations and thanks to all of the teachers involved.

Mazeltov to the Matrics of 2013 and their parents.  They have definitely done HERZLIA and their community proud.

MARIANNE MARKSPRINCIPAL, HERZLIA HIGH SCHOOL

MH Goldschmidt Avenue, Highlands Estate, Cape Town, 8001
PO Box 3508, Cape Town, 8000
Tel: +27 21 464 3300  Fax: +27 21 461 8834
Email: mmarks@herzlia.comWeb: http://www.herzlia.com

GEOFF COHENDirector of EducationMH Goldschmidt Avenue, Highlands Estate, Cape Town, 8001
PO Box 3508, Cape Town, 8000
Tel: +27 21 464 3304  Fax: +27 21 461 8647Email: mailto:geoffc@herzlia.com Web: http://www.herzlia.com

Stephen Darori on Mandela's South African Jews

Dear Friends of Herzlia

After what seems like an interminable wait, we are delighted to announce the results of HERZLIA’s Matric Class of 2013 and to confirm that our pupils have once again excelled.

Please note that the National Senior Certificate (NSC) results are reported as follows:

  • There are no aggregates
  • The term ‘Matric Exemption” has been replaced by ‘Admission to Higher Education – PASS BACHELORS’
  • ‘Admission to Higher Education – PASS DIPLOMA’ indicates admissions to various diploma courses.

Following is a summary of the HERZLIA Matric results for 2013:

115 Matric candidates

100% pass rate – academically inclusive school

112 admissions to Higher Education – PASS BACHELORS (Matric Exemption) = (97.4%)

337 Subject Distinctions

2 candidates, Hannah Delit and Kezia Varkel, achieved 100% for Economics.

92 out of 115 candidates achieved one or more distinctions (80%)

1 candidate achieved 10 out of 10 distinctions

2 candidates achieved 9 out of…

View original post 529 more words

JEWISH MAFIA “But He Was Good To His Mother”

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English: Mugshot of Jewish-American mobster Be...

English: Mugshot of Jewish-American mobster Benjamin “Bigsy” Siegel in the 1920s. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

JEWISH MAFIA

“But He Was Good To His Mother”

A short and very interesting little article about why Jewish gangsters fascinate him and how Jewish gangsters differed from their Italian counterparts. In a nutshell, Jewish mobsters were a product of their times (1920s and 1930s) and did not continue their legacy after that one period, while Italian gangsters handed their “profession” to each succeeding generation.

What follows is a side of Jewish history you may have missed.

There are few excuses for the behavior of Jewish gangsters in the 1920s and 1930s. The best known Jewish gangsters – Meyer Lansky, Bugsy Siegel, Longy Zwillman, Moe Dalitz, David Berman were involved in the numbers rackets, illegal drugdealing, prostitution, gambling and loan sharking. They were not nice men.

During the rise of American Nazism in the 1930s and when Israel was being founded between 1945 and 1948, however, they proved staunch defenders of the Jewish people.

The roots of Jewish gangsterism lay in the ethnic neighborhoods of the Lower East Side; Brownsville, Brooklyn; Maxwell Street in Chicago; and Boyle Heights in Los Angeles. Like other newly arrived groups in American history, a few Jews who considered themselves blocked from respectable professions used crime as a means to “make good” economically. The market for vice flourished during Prohibition and Jews joined with others to exploit the artificial market created by the legal bans on alcohol, gambling, paid sex and narcotics.

Few of these men were religiously observant. They rarely attended services, although they did support congregations financially. They did not keep kosher or send their children to day schools. However, at crucial moments they protected other Jews, in America and around the world.

The 1930s were a period of rampant anti-Semitism in America , particularly in the Midwest . Father Charles Coughlin, the Radio Priest in Detroit , and William Pelley of Minneapolis , among others, openly called for Jews to be driven from positions of responsibility, if not from the country itself.

Organized Brown Shirts in New York and Silver Shirts in Minneapolis outraged and terrorized American Jewry. While the older and more respectable Jewish organizations pondered a response that would not alienate non-Jewish supporters, others–including a few rabbis–asked the gangsters to break up American Nazi rallies.

Historian Robert Rockaway writing in the journal of the American Jewish Historical Society, notes that German-American Bund rallies in the New York City area posed a dilemma for mainstream Jewish leaders. They wanted the rallies stopped, but had no legal grounds on which to do so. New York State Judge Nathan Perlman personally contacted Meyer Lansky to ask him to disrupt the Bund rallies, with the proviso that Lansky’s henchmen stop short of killing any Bundists.

Enthusiastic for the assignment, if disappointed by the restraints, Lansky accepted all of Perlman’s terms except one: he would take no money for the work. Lansky later observed, “I was a Jew and felt for those Jews in Europe who were suffering. They were my brothers.”

For months, Lansky’s workmen effectively broke up one Nazi rally after another. As Rockaway notes, “Nazi arms, legs and ribs were broken and skulls were cracked, but no one died.”

Lansky recalled breaking up a Brown Shirt rally in the Yorkville section of Manhattan : “The stage was decorated with a swastika and a picture of Hitler. The speakers started ranting. There were only fifteen of us, but we went into action. We threw some of them out the windows…. Most of the Nazis panicked and ran out. We chased them and beat them up…. We wanted to show them that Jews would not always sit back and accept insults.”

In Minneapolis , William Dudley Pelley organized a Silver Shirt Legion to “rescue” America from an imaginary Jewish-Communist conspiracy. In Pelle’s own words, just as “Mussolini and his Black Shirts saved Italy and as Hitler and his Brown Shirts saved Germany ,” he would save America from Jewish communists. Minneapolis gambling czar David Berman confronted Pelley’s Silver Shirts on behalf of the Minneapolis Jewish community.

Berman learned that Silver Shirts were mounting a rally at Lodge. When the Nazi leader called for all the “Jew bastards” in the city to be expelled, or worse, Berman and his associates burst into the room and started cracking heads. After ten minutes, they had emptied the hall. His suit covered in blood, Berman took the microphone and announced, “This is a warning. Anybody who says anything against Jews gets the same treatment. Only next time it will be worse.” After Berman broke up two more rallies, there were no more public Silver Shirt meetings in Minneapolis .

Jewish gangsters also helped establish Israel after the war. One famous example is a meeting between Bugsy Siegel and Reuven Dafne, a Haganah emissary, in 1945. Dafne was seeking funds and guns to help liberate Palestine from British rule. A mutual friend arranged for the two men to meet.

“You mean to tell me Jews are fighting?” Siegel asked, “You mean fighting as in killing?” Dafne answered in the affirmative. Siegel replied, “I’m with you.”

For weeks, Dafne received suitcases filled with $5 and $10 bills – $50,000 in all – from Siegel.

No one should paint gangsters as heroes. They committed acts of great evil. But historian Rockaway has presented a textured version of Jewish gangster history in a book ironically titled But He Was Good to His Mother.

Some have observed that, despite their disreputable behavior, they could be good to their people, too. A little interesting bit of Jewish history.